News Releases

News Release - Manitoba

August 20, 2021

STATEMENT FROM INDIGENOUS RECONCILIATION AND NORTHERN RELATIONS MINISTER ALAN LAGIMODIERE ON THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY SIGNING OF TREATY 2



Tomorrow we celebrate a historic milestone of great importance to our province, the 150th anniversary of the signing of Treaty No. 2, signed on Aug. 21, 1871. I invite all Manitobans to honour this significant relationship and share in our commitment to advancing reconciliation in building a stronger Manitoba.
 
Not only are the treaties vital to the history of this country, they also remain an important part of our collective identity. We respect the treaties and agreements that were made on these lands and remain committed to working in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people in the spirit of reconciliation and collaboration.
 
Treaties were negotiated in Canada between First Nations and the British Crown as early as 1701 and continued in both pre- and post-Confederation periods.
 
Treaty No. 2 was negotiated and entered in August 1871 at the Manitoba House Fur Trading Post, also known as the ‘Manitoba Post Treaty’, on the west shore of Lake Manitoba. 
 
A few communities that share in the Treaty No. 2 include Brandon, Dauphin, Melita, Minnedosa, Roblin, Virden and many more.
 
The First Nation communities that entered into Treaty No. 2 include: 
Dauphin River,
Ebb and Flow,
Keeseekoowenin,
Lake St. Martin,
Lake Manitoba,
Little Saskatchewan,
O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Sipi,
Pinaymootang, and 
Skownan.
 
Treaty 2 extends north and west of Treaty 1 territory, from the east shore of Lake Winnipeg, across the centre and southwest of Manitoba to the Moose Mountains in southeast Rupertsland. This territory includes 8,676,828 hectares of land, including Riding Mountains, Duck Mountains, Turtle Mountains, Hecla/Grindstone and Moose Mountains.
 
Honouring the treaty relationship is based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership. Within our history, we have lost sight of the importance of these treaties and as treaty partners, we must align ourselves to the spirit in which they were entered. Honouring this relationship is just as important today as it was 150 years ago, and reconciling what has happened between then and now will put us on the path to a stronger Manitoba comprised of vibrant communities and thriving individuals.
 
We are all treaty people, and it is our shared responsibility as Manitobans to implement the spirit and intent of which Treaty No. 2 was signed.
 
 
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